Wheelwrights
Above: It's thought that the building on the right at the back was a wheelwright's.
Note the clapper bridge in the foreground.
From my own collection

Thomas Free, a wheelwright, was a witness before a committee investigating election bribery and corruption in 1859. Mr Whiteway asked him to vote for Mr Astell, but he said he would not 'turn over' from Mr Moffatt. Mr Whiteway said that he would give him £100 to pay off any obligation that Mr Free had to Mr Moffatt.
Morning Chronicle 28 July 1859, p2 col3

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                                                         Wheelwrights in the 1861 census
James Nankivell, 14, was an apprentice wheelwright, living or staying in the North Street area.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 55, p19

John Hooper, 17, was an apprentice wheelwright, living or staying in East Street.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 30, p9

John Chalk, 19, was a wheelwright living or staying in North Street.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 36, p22

John Luscombe, at the Victoria Inn, North Street, was both a wheelwright and an innkeeper.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 58, p25

John Skinner, 14, was an apprentice wheelwright living or staying in North Street
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 58, p26

Samuel Jewell, 19, was a wheelwright living or staying in Browses Buildings.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 81, p33

Solomon Mugrdige, 57, was a wheelwright living or staying in North Street.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 34, p17

William Leaman 63, was both a wheelwright and smith, living or staying in North Street.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 57, p24

William Row, 22, was a wheelwright lodging in Browses Buildings.
RG9, piece no 1405, folio 80, p31

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1859. Mrs Knowling, wheelwright, was selling ash and elm planks that would be of interest to coachbuilders and wheelwrights. Her address was North Street, Ashburton.
Western Times 8 January 1859, p4 col2

William and Mary Knowling were living in North Street at the time of the 1861 census. Aged 39, William was a master wheelwright employing 2 men and 3 apprentices.
One of their daughters was Laura A (see below).
1861 census RG09, piece no. 1405, folio 39, p28

In 1876 Wm Knowling, wheelwright, was selling 300 dozen spokes and a lot of small nave stocks.
Western Times 11 August 1876, p1 col2

A kingfisher, described as very rare, was  caught in a wheelwright's in Ashburton in November 1870. It was 'a very fine bird'.
The Cornish Telegraph 23 November 1870, p4 col5

John Preston, a wheelwright of Ashburton, contributed £25 bail money for John Sandercock in 1876, after the latter was committed for trial on a charge of assault and attempted rape.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette and Daily Telegrams, 16 August 1876, p4 col3

Hatch, wheelwright, Ashburton, was selling a market trap and a phaeton in April 1908, and someone of the same name was still selling items until at least 1949.
Western Times 24 April 1908, p4 col6
Western Times 24 March 1949, p2 col7

John Hatch, of Terrace House*, Ashburton, was a 51 year old wheelwright at the time of the 1911 census.
With him and his wife Laura Ann were 3 children, including Harold John Hatch, who was a wheelwright assisting his father. William Knowling, John's father-in-law, who was a retired wheelwright, was also in the household.
1911 census, RG 14, piece no 12727
*Rew Road goes to the right of the building shown at the top of the page. Terrace House is on the opposite side of Rew Road.